Oakland’s wild rail path

The seasons are changing now, if you follow the pagan calendar. This weekend marks the turning point between astronomical pagan summer (6 May to 6 August) and pagan autumn (6 August to 6 November), or as I think of them, High Season and Waning. They are offset exactly half a season from the conventional astronomical seasons. High Season consists of long days, and Waning consists of shortening days. (Likewise, Low Season consists of short days, and Quickening consists of lengthening days.)

Nature is acutely aware of these seasons. The belladonna lily (Amaryllis belladonna) sends up its naked-lady flowers at this time. The strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo) ripens its rich little fruits (I can understand why Pliny the Elder named them “eat-only-one” because they’re so satisfying).

And of course the blackberries are in full swing.

I returned last week after eight years to the “secret street” at the south end of Florence Avenue, where it meets the old railbed of the Sacramento Northern Railway (also known as the Oakland, Antioch, and Eastern Railway). Unlike that first visit, when I was busy and could only gaze up the path, this time I had the leisure to walk its whole length, up to Broadway Terrace where it’s fenced off.

The path has geology up at its north end, but it’s worthy just as woods. Even right next to the Warren Freeway, it’s as secluded as any place in Oakland.

It’s shown as the dashed route on this map. You can see that Florence Avenue, heading over a saddle in the ridge above Piedmont, used to connect with Florence Terrace once upon a time. That’s the Lake Temescal park at the top.

There are lots of blackberries growing here, so don’t wait. The first ones are the best. Near the north end is a landslide scar that was repaired with much labor to protect some homes on Sheridan Road. The work was finished with dark shotcrete, but it doesn’t really blend in.

If you look close you’ll see little splotches of white. Those mark cracks where lime-bearing groundwater has seeped through and deposited calcite as it evaporates.

I can foresee these growing into falls of travertine in a few years. Beyond the landslide is a high cut into the hillside, made decades ago when the rail line was first pushed through. And the bedrock here is mapped as classic Franciscan melange, the big blue field on the geologic map — the edge of which happens to correspond to the Hayward fault.

I half expected the rock exposed here to be fault gouge, the fine-ground, mealy stuff that fills many of California’s active faults (for instance at the London Road slide). It’s real close to it: highly weathered mudstone that’s likely to come down hard in our next big quake. Whether the railbed will be cleared again afterward can only be conjectured. I’ll look at this cut again more thoroughly next time I’m here, whenever that might be.

On your way back, look again for blackberries. I know I didn’t get them all.

2 Responses to “Oakland’s wild rail path”

  1. donna Says:

    maybe Im wrong but I believe the strawberry tree is poisonous maybe not life threatening but you shouldn’t eat them

  2. Andrew Alden Says:

    Went back today and there are still blackberries. The rock is sheared fine-grained mudstone, with a few carbonate veins, and not gouge except maybe at the south end of the exposure. Also, you can walk around the fence at the north end — much more convenient.

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