Archive for the ‘Oakland blueschist’ Category

Lake Temescal, the west side

12 April 2021

For one of Oakland’s most rugged places, the west side of Lake Temescal doesn’t expose a lot of rock. But what’s there is unusual for Oakland, and interesting.

I’m talking about this ridge — tectonically, a shutter ridge — across the lake from the swimming beach.

The map of Lake Temescal Regional Park shows two trails there, the low one along the water and the high one up in the woods. An even higher trail, not marked on the map, is off limits and doesn’t expose much rock anyway.

I often wish I’d lived here in the 19th century when Oakland was new. It was in 1868 when Anthony Chabot acquired a steep little canyon back of the hills and built a dam to supply the young city with dependable water service. His technique, perfected in the gold fields of the Sierra, was to take a high-pressure water hose and wash down the sand and gravel from the hillsides to build the dam. I wish I could have inspected the scrubbed slopes at that time, but there were almost no trained geologists in the whole state, let alone me.

The canyon has a flat floor now, after decades of sedimentation, but you can see from the high trail that it’s still steep and narrow.

And the action didn’t end when Chabot finished the dam. He built a control tower in the new reservoir, but a landslide soon took it out. I’m guessing that was probably near the sluicegate where the beach house is today, and I’m guessing that the rainy winters of 1868-69 and 1869-70 plus afterslip and aftershocks of the big 1868 earthquake on the Hayward fault had something to do with it.

Speaking of which, two major strands of the Hayward fault run right through the reservoir. They’re helpfully shown on the map above. This is where the main strand crosses the dam. (Don’t worry, the massive dam will not fail even under the largest possible quake on this fault.)

The dam itself was raised and then lowered during the next few decades, and presumably the lake rose and fell too. Meanwhile trees and brush moved in upon the slopes where the Ohlone had previously maintained grassy meadows, and the rocks decayed and soil built up.

And the rocks themselves embody the complicated history of starting out in a vigorous subduction zone, being deeply buried and exhumed probably more than once, then being torn up and shoved around by the San Andreas fault system of which the Hayward fault is part.

All that is to say that Lake Temescal is a dynamic area at all time scales. It’s more complex than the small-scale geologic maps can show, even though it’s complex enough on that map.


KJfm, Franciscan melange; ch, chert block; af, artificial fill; sc, silica-carbonate rock; sp, serpentinite; Jsv, Leona volcanics; fs, Franciscan sandstone; KJkm, Knoxville Formation

The west side is mapped as melange, which is basically a mess of mashed-up sandstone with big blocks of other rocks, each with its own separate history, suspended in it. The little blip labeled “ch” is this block of chert at the top of Hill Road. So when I visited the west side trails last week, I expected to find things I didn’t expect. And most of the rock along the trails appears to be nondescript sandstone — I say appears because since hammering is forbidden, it’s hard to find a fresh surface. But lo and behold, along the high path coming down from Broadway Terrace, there’s the telltale gleam of blueschist in the exposed subsoil.

The color really comes out when you wet a piece.

Other apparently high-grade metamorphic rocks include this hard, glittering schist. Not having access to thin sections and petrographic microscopes, I can’t check for the presence of jadeite, which has been reported in blocks from this melange.

And over at the north end of the train is a distinctive outcrop of another schist. Hard rock supports slow-growing lichens, and the species differ depending on the rock’s chemistry.

Underneath the lichens, the rock is a bluish-gray mixture with a strongly folded texture, both signs of a rock that’s been through a lot of distortion at high pressure and temperature. These photos are from exposures by the lawn. The first shows the folding and the second shows fault-related crushing on the left side. The crushed material is called gouge, and bits of it are common in this sector.

My authority on Oakland’s Franciscan rocks, John Wakabayashi, holds that the west side of the lake hides the same ancient major thrust fault — a megathrust, in fact — that’s famously exposed in El Cerrito above the recycling center, where high-grade rocks have been pushed above lower-grade rocks. Unfortunately the fault itself appears to be in “a brush-filled gully with no exposure,” so it may be a while before we ever learn more.

But I did learn something more last week, about the beach house.

It is made with the local rock, namely the Leona volcanics. Whether the stones came from the hill just upslope to the east, the one that collapsed in the 1870s landslide, or from across the freeway in the great Tunnel Road cut during the 1930s, I do not know. I’m guessing the former, but I would be happy to be wrong if it means I can be certain. Putting the building and the roadcut in the same photo, there is a resemblance.

The fun thing is, both locations can be closely inspected. That sounds like a good afternoon project.

Decorative blueschist

11 May 2020

Since the shutdown I’ve been scrupulous about going out only on essential business. Yes, my idea of essential is wandering around with one eye on the ground, the other on the landscape and my mind in the clouds, but it’s not really essential. Basic, baseline exercise is essential, and I can get that in with a walk of a mile or two.

That said, a walk of a mile or two can take you to lots of interesting places no matter where you live. The upper part of Fairmount Avenue is within that perimeter, and that’s where this stone wall caught my eye. Oakland’s houses of a certain age occasionally feature our local blueschist, and this is a particularly striking example.

Just a few feet farther, the scope of the work emerges.

The entire front of the property, plus the long stairway to the entrance including the risers, employs this stone to dignified effect.

Blueschist can be garish, but here it complements both the concrete and the Craftsman house in color and texture. I took a close look at it to compare with its appearance at various Oakland locations. The stone is unusually sound and was apparently quarried for this purpose. I don’t think rock yards carry this kind of unfashionable stone today — it’s hard to source large, consistent quantities, and artisanal stonemasons are no longer as plentiful as they were a century ago.

I don’t know any commercial sources of rock like this, although it’s conceivable the old Hutchinson quarry in El Cerrito, where the recycling center is today, used to yield some from its upper level. I suspect it came from a pit in the Crestmont/Serpentine Prairie area. This big exposure on Old Redwood Road shows the general quality of the rock up there.

Some of the rock in Crestmont is a pretty close match, but in general it’s more fractured and pocked with carbonates.

I suspect, but have no way of proving at present, that this old pit at the back edge of Serpentine Prairie was the source. Our serpentinite/blueschist isn’t useful for crushed stone, and although “a few tons” of poor-quality asbestos was once mined up here, this particular rock has no sign of containing tempting amounts of chrysotile. So that leaves decorative stone as the most likely product.

And that reminds me that I need to visit the meadow up there soon, for the exercise.

Lake Chabot’s north shore

23 December 2019

Oakland has a lot of ground to cover, and it can take a while for me to return to places I’ve been before. In this case, it’s been four years since I traversed the trails on the north side of Lake Chabot, between the reservoir and the golf course.

The land is much the same (though I’ll point out some differences). It’s my frame of reference that’s changed.

Here’s the Google Earth view of the area. My walk started near the dam and went up the trail (the Bass Cove Trail) along the west edge of the lake, then back down on the unmarked, unsigned trail running just west of all the chaparral.

The latter trail is basically an access road for the power line that runs through here over the hills. The land ownership is mixed, but there are no barriers.

For reference, here’s the bedrock map of the same area. (It also shows the access road snaking along the power line.)

Jsv is the Leona volcanics, KJk the Knoxville Formation, and the slightly darker green on the right is the Joaquin Miller Formation. The blue section labeled KJfm is mapped as Franciscan melange. I’ll show you some of these. What’s changed in my frame of reference is that I’ve learned there are conflicting interpretations of that blue section. I found no smoking-gun evidence in my visit, so you’ll be spared the details in this post, but my eyes were peeled in a way they weren’t before.

I like a lot of things about this time of year. For purposes of geologizing, the footing is firm and quiet even off the trail. Also, the rain has washed the outcrops clean.

Of course, rocks like this are still covered with lichens so you can’t be quite sure what they are. The best-exposed rocks are in the streambeds, like this blueschist boulder.

All three of these are in the melange unit. For purposes of my enlightenment, it’s the matrix between these blocks that’s crucial, but none of that was visible. Just have to keep looking.

The sandstone of the Joaquin Miller Formation is nicely exposed in the rain-washed roadways.

It’s a pretty pure sandstone; there are spots in the trail where rainwater has washed the eroding stone downhill into sandy drifts.

Sand is nearly eternal. It can be recycled time and again in the rock cycle for hundreds of millions of years. But that’s another post.

And off the trail I was pleased to find some excellent examples of the conglomerate at the base of the Knoxville Formation, which is otherwise mostly shale.

The rounded cobbles in this exposure are largely composed of the Leona volcanics, proof of the genetic link between the two bodies of rock and a clue to the geography of ancient California during the Late Jurassic.

Enough bedrock. Other things I like about this time of year are that it’s cool, the air is clean and fragrant, the colors are distinctive and the light is interesting. It’s a primo time, if you ask me, to walk the high hills, and this part of town offers good views of Fairmont Ridge and the lake.

Even a peek at the Hayward hills and Mission Peak beyond.

The parks district has been visibly sprucing things up in the park. And along the power line, it’s obvious that PG&E has been at work too, taking the fire risk seriously by reducing the fuel load.

They’ll probably shred this plant material and leave it on the ground, but I would favor some good old-fashioned controlled burning here in the fire-friendly chaparral. They’re even making a little headway against the eucalyptus, which besides its fire hazard tends to shed limbs. Eucs make fine specimen trees, like the one across the way, but lousy forests when they aren’t well tended — take a look at Australia these days.

Lake Chabot and the surrounding parks are a special part of Oakland. Get yourself out there; let your mind roam free.

Even at the bottom of the year, there’s a lot of good light.

The Dunsmuir-Chabot trail

1 October 2018

The most remote part of Oakland will be opened to public access fairly soon, when the East Bay Regional Parks District finally gets around to constructing a trail between Dunsmuir Ridge and Lake Chabot. I made my way into part of the route a few weeks back. It’s interesting and inviting territory, set above an untouched oak-filled stream valley with Fairmont Ridge beyond.

The land has divided ownership, with parcels belonging to the city, EBMUD and the East Bay Regional Parks District. They’re all public agencies, so the bureaucracy must have been difficult. Here’s the setting, as laid out in a 2009 EBRPD map.

The solid blue line is a trail in Anthony Chabot Regional Park that’s been closed for years. The dashed blue line is the proposed Dunsmuir Heights to Chabot Regional Trail.

This summer the EBRPD board was shown this map of the approximate route. Again, the solid line is an existing (deteriorated) roadway and the dashed part will be built from scratch. The photo at the top of this post is the view from the EBMUD water tank at top center. The part I’ll be showing is between there and the “P” mark at the city golf course.

A couple more maps to help you see what’s here. First is the bare land as shown in Google Maps terrain view.

The centerpiece of the trail’s route is the valley in the lower right quadrant. Note its depth and steepness. The permanent stream in that valley has no formal name, so I will hereby dub it Chabot Creek. And finally here’s the same area in the 1947 topographic map, which shows the old roads that will become the trail.

If you look at the upper part of Chabot Creek valley, you’ll see it turns sharply from southeast to southwest as you go downhill. On the Google map, though, the streamcourse is interrupted by a flat area. That’s landfill made of waste from the Cypress Viaduct, which collapsed in the 1989 earthquake. It’s sterile and weedy, but the view is nice.

At its edge is a curious structure, visible in Google Earth, that turns out to be a spillway, made for the event of a large rainstorm during a very wet winter. Presumably the landfill was capped with a layer of clay to stop any contaminants from leaching into Chabot Creek, and thus the site would fill with rainwater quickly and have a risk of spillover.

If you looked closely at the second map, you saw the intriguing pointers to an “old foundation” and a “1936 WPA rock chimney.” The chimney is a massive stone fireplace, suitable for a hunting lodge. But the building it once occupied is gone. Foundations around it show that it was a group facility of some kind. I’m hoping that local historians can say more about it in the comments.

A stone in the entryway is carved with the date 1935, so the map is slightly in error.

In any case, the stonework is indeed classic WPA masonry, of the same vintage, material and durability as the Woodminster Cascades in Joaquin Miller Park.

And speaking of stone, what are the rocks like around here, you ask. Here’s what’s mapped in the area.

“Jsv” is the Leona volcanics, “KJk” is the sedimentary Knoxville Formation, and the blue field is Franciscan melange, the same body of rock underlying Knowland Park. When I visited, I checked out a roadcut right where the Franciscan and Knoxville meet and found an assortment of rocks.

All of these are appropriate for the Franciscan, but the brown sandstone could just as easily be from the Knoxville. A return visit is in order during the upcoming wet season, when the ground is firmer. I hope to see more signs of the Franciscan “knockers” so well exposed in Knowland Park — and on the golf course, like this blueschist knocker cropping out in the rough.

The plans for the Dunsmuir Heights to Chabot Trail are supposed to come up for public comment this fall, with the work to be completed by 2021.