Archive for the ‘Oakland rock types’ Category

The Paleocene blob revisited

15 February 2021

It may seem to readers like I’ve been out in the field during the past year, but in fact I’ve been holding back since the lockdown last March, taking my own advice. Last week, on the verge of receiving the Covid vaccine, I decided to formally resume geologizing, and start by giving a small patch of rocks a new, more thorough inspection.

It was thirteen years ago when I first reconnoitered this odd little area of rocks, shown on the geologic map as unit Ta, “unnamed glauconitic sandstone (Paleocene).” It’s described as “coarse-grained, green, glauconite-rich, lithic sandstone with well-preserved coral fossils. Locally interbedded with gray mudstone and hard, fine-grained, mica-bearing quartz sandstone.”

Here’s a closeup in Google Maps with the outline of the “Ta” unit. It manifests as a ridge-forming substrate that is undermined by an active landslide scar (part of which is the notorious Snake Road/Armour Drive landslide) on its northwest end.

In a systematic approach, I sought out the three places marked on the map with strike-and-dip symbols. (I used this same strategy a couple years ago with the overlying Eocene mudstone unit.)

The northernmost site, at the stub end of Armour Drive, is hopeless; it’s been thoroughly disrupted by the Snake Road landslide, and the fortress houses being built on the scar will disturb it more as the owners landscape their grounds. There were no good exposures at all, let alone one showing beds dipping 80 degrees south. But this is what some of the rock looks like: a dark siltstone with a greenish tinge and a bit of clay in it.

The middle locality was where my hopes were highest — an aborted foundation pit on Saroni Drive where the “well-preserved coral fossils” had been documented. In fact, I had asked Russ Graymer, compiler of the geologic map, about this pit. That was in 2009, which by his account was 14 years after he’d visited it (or a good 25 years ago today). He replied that his notes from the site were as follows: “The rock here is massive, black, coarse-grained, glauconitic sandstone and pebbly sandstone. There are many fossils here, including pecten, coral (Paleocene?), shark teeth, and snail. There is also pink-brown siltstone and brown mudstone.”

All I can say is I wish I’d been here 25 years ago.

I gave the site a thorough look, without hammering anything as is my practice. I saw no pebbly mudstone, not even any coarse-grained sand. I noted clayey siltstone and silty shale, hard here and soft there, with fine to massive bedding. On the lefthand side the shale beds were vertical, with the upper side to the east. Nothing that I could possibly interpret as overturned beds with a 60-degree dip.

Elsewhere the rocks had no reliable bedding. Down in front were some crumbling mudstone boulders. One of them had some vague fossil-like shapes that fizzed in acid, but the eyes can be fooled and our rocks commonly have some lime in them. It’s not always meaningful, though I always check for it.

You may wonder how this rock unit was determined to be of Paleocene age, unique in Oakland. As I recall our conversation, Graymer was accompanied that day by Earl Brabb, who said the corals reminded him of Paleocene corals he knew from the Santa Cruz Mountains. In fact I wrote Brabb for more detail and he replied with the location of the roadcut he had in mind. But I never got over there, the email was lost, and Earl Brabb died a few years later. Now I would never gainsay Brabb’s judgment — he was a top-tier field geologist — but that’s the main line of evidence behind this age assignment.

I wish he had been with me at the third site. It’s under a power-line tower north of a bend in Balboa Drive and consists of thin-bedded siltstone, nicely tilted. This spot, at least, is still good.

The roadcut on Balboa Drive was where I hit paydirt. Bedding surfaces were exposed that included sole marks. These occur on the underside of beds, and they indicate that here the rocks are overturned, contrary to what the map shows.

And in the gutter of the curve, buffed by errant car tires, were a couple of these round, laminated objects nestled in situ among the siltstone beds. They responded to acid, indicating that the laminations included calcite. And the rocks nearby displayed a fine vein of solid calcite about 4 millimeters thick.

I would peg these as some sort of fossil, but Earl Brabb might well have said they were just like the Paleocene corals he knew from the Santa Cruz Mountains. The setting could have been a cold seep, such as are known elsewhere in the Great Valley Sequence.

The rocks of the Oakland Hills are poorly organized and poorly exposed, and hence not really well mapped. They’ve been overturned and broken and shuffled around. Whenever I try to make sense of them I doubt my senses; that’s the way the Earth just is here. A geologic map is as much an exercise in imagination as in observation. The pros are certainly better mappers than I am, but they aren’t superhuman and their work can be interrogated; the rocks can speak differently with each visit. The outline on the map, as far as I can tell by checking around its edges, is fairly correct — you’ll notice that every line is dashed, meaning it’s inferred, not firmly nailed down.

The “Ta” rock unit hasn’t revealed itself to me as a coarse-grained green lithic sandstone, more like a fine-grained sorta greenish lithic siltstone. Geologists train themselves and have tools to specify rock colors, but to me green is always suspect; our woods favor mosses and algae, and our weathering environment favors rusty colors.

The rock here is definitely something other than the Redwood Canyon Formation to the south and the Eocene mudstone to the north. It’s a little piece of somewhere different.

Mapping rocks never ends

1 February 2021

A few days ago I took part in the latest monthly meeting of my local geological society — we do it via Zoom these days — and our speaker, Christie Rowe of McGill University, reported on three research projects her grad students are doing in the Bay area, specifically the Franciscan Complex. The Franciscan is a scramble of different rocks that has challenged geologists since they first came to California.

Fifty years ago Stanford’s Gary Ernst recognized that the Franciscan represents the mess of material that gathers around a subduction zone, where oceanic crust (a now-extinct neighbor of the Pacific plate, in our case) slides beneath continental crust (the North America plate). So now we know what it is — the tectonic equivalent of the dirt in a bulldozer’s blade — and prompted by that knowledge we can try to unscramble the mixed-up pieces and learn what they might tell us about California’s geologic history or what happens in subduction zones.

Rowe is a Marin County native who’s been working since her PhD days on the latter problem, in the Franciscan rocks of her home ground. Specifically, she’s been looking for preserved bits of ancient earthquake faults. Normally these are buried deep underground, but they’re important because subduction-related earthquakes, so-called megathrust events, are the largest on the planet. Think of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake in Japan, the magnitude-9 monster whose tenth anniversary is coming up on 11 March. The Marin Headlands are full of them, broken in pieces.

Rare bits of the Franciscan have survived being subducted deeper than 25 kilometers and then returned to the surface, without totally wiping out what happened to them down there. The work requires dogged persistence. You have to look hard to find these “high-grade blocks” in the first place, then put your face close to them, magnifiers out, detect signs of slippage, then bring samples to the lab and determine what that slippage means — whether it happened on the way down, on the way up or afterward as the San Andreas fault system wrenched it all sideways.

Heart Rock, at Jenner Beach up the Sonoma coast, is small enough to fit inside a living room. One of Rowe’s grad students is mapping it at centimeter scale, spending a master’s thesis worth of effort on this one outcrop looking at rocks like this.

Seeing all this during Rowe’s talk took my mind, among other places, out to the rocks of Shepherd Canyon and Redwood Peak. The last person to give those strata a PhD-level scrutiny, using all available tools of the time, was a Berkeley grad student named Jim Case around 1960. Yes, 1960, a time when researchers were stuck in a mental framework of now-forgotten concepts and plate tectonics was still years in the future, when optical microscopes, brass seives, fossil correlations and test-tube chemistry were the best tools we had.

Case got his PhD, demonstrating that he’d mastered these tools as well as the literature, but he didn’t accomplish much more than correct a couple of ideas from earlier studies, establish a few new rock units on the map and tentatively correlate them with other units scattered around the East Bay. He put his little brick into the Wall of Science, then went on to a long research and teaching career doing other things.

Since then, other distinguished geologists have been over this territory. Case collaborated with Dorothy Radbruch of the USGS, a sharp and able field geologist. And in the late 1990s when Russ Graymer was putting together the East Bay geologic map that I rely on, he tramped the area with the late Earl Brabb and was ably advised by the late David Jones. Each of these workers found new things and revised their predecessors’ achievements. It always paid to reinspect the rocks. Nevertheless, none of them pulled out all the stops and pioneered a new in-depth reassessment of this interesting area.

We could do much better today. Every tool has advanced. The jigsaw puzzle of ancient California is far enough finished that any piece, if studied closely enough, can be placed on the table near — or even exactly on — its correct position and joined to other pieces. This would be more satisfying than what Case could accomplish in his time. We just need another grad student to take it on, another local who has imprinted on his or her home ground.

Mapping never ends, and geologic mapping always improves. New bits of rock are being exposed all the time. Fresh eyes see new things, and persistence furthers.

The changing identities of the Leona Quarry

9 November 2020

Last week I finally gave in and returned to the high hills — for exercise, as permitted by the county health authorities — and couldn’t resist a reconnaissance of the Leona Heights area. It’s Oakland’s boldest and most rugged region. Here it is from Knowland Park, above the zoo.

Most Oaklanders may know it, though, as the mountainside with the huge scar on it overlooking I-580, the former Leona Quarry.

The quarry was first opened by the Ransome-Crummey Company in 1904 and ended operations under Gallagher & Burk in 2003, but it changed hands (and names) several times over the years, making its detailed history hard to trace. Also, newspaper accounts often confuse it with the Leona Heights quarry, which was at the site Merritt College occupies today.

The quarry was first made feasible by an extension of the Laundry Farm railroad, above Mills College. It was originally high up a steep grade, as shown by the pick-and-hammer symbol in the 1915 topographic map.

I believe it was up there because the bedrock was well exposed, making excavation unnecessary at a time of heavy reliance on hand labor. The 1947 map shows that operations had moved downhill, and quite a bite had been taken out of the hillside.

And the 1980 update of the 1959 map shows the quarry scar at its ultimate size.

The whole time, this hillside was being quarried exclusively to make crushed rock. There was a huge demand for coarsely crushed stone in the days before asphalt and concrete pavement. The gold standard for city streets in the late 1800s and early 1900s was macadam, which has completely disappeared since then. You’ll only see it in silent movies.

A macadam road started with a shallow excavation that was filled with several layers of crushed rock, of successively finer grade, topped with fine gravel or rock dust. The jagged, blocky texture of crushed rock made macadam roads exceptionally firm in comparison to plain dirt or gravel, and they didn’t turn to mud in the rainy season.

As Oakland grew, filling in the harbor and airport and covering East Oakland with suburban tracts on an ambitious street grid, its quarry owners prospered, especially the well-connected ones who could arrange favorable contracts and keep wages low. Plain old crushed rock — road metal — was in high demand. Although there were still good markets for crushed rock after the macadam era ended, things were not the same. The Leona Quarry outlasted all of its competition in Oakland thanks to its remote location, good rail transport and ease of production. But eventually the city expanded to the quarry’s doorstep, the quarry ran out of easy rock and the show ended in 2003, when I took this shot of the north end of the property.

That’s when the site took on its next identity — a townhome district. The rock no longer matters.

But it used to. I think the Leona Quarry started running into problems as the standards in the rock business grew steadily stricter.

Leona Heights, the mountain, consists of a body of much-altered volcanic material of Jurassic age that I refer to on this blog as the Leona volcanics. Its eventful history left it impregnated with pyrite, iron sulfide, in many places. A little farther northwest, in the valley where route 13 splits from I-580, there was enough pyrite to support at least two mines. Down at the Leona Quarry there wasn’t as much, but it does exist and, as it does in the old mines, pyrite decays in the air and rain into iron oxides and sulfuric acid. The oxides turn brown, staining the Leona volcanics this typical color.

They also stain the stream water, as seen here in the headwaters of Chimes Creek above the quarry (and elsewhere in the hills).

The west side of the quarry was full of this “red rock” while the east side consisted of a dense blue-gray siliceous rock, more like this specimen I collected there back in 2009.

Whereas the red rock was useless for things like concrete aggregate because of its pyrite content, this was the good stuff. Nevertheless, the market for excellent road metal came to be dominated by huge outfits like Granite Rock — whose co-founder, Arthur Roberts Wilson, started his career at the Leona Heights Quarry back in the 1890s.

Meanwhile today, the former quarry is now a townhome plantation, set at the bottom of a high, steep rocky bowl.

There is no guarantee that the quarry’s second identity will last forever. Fire, earthquake and rockfalls can overcome any defense given enough time (although the Leona Quarry development has a GHAD that maintains the defenses). Zoning changes and real-estate fashions can undermine such enterprises as surely as physical hazards. There is no guarantee that anything we build will last a century, like the quarry did. Like the ancient philosopher said, everything flows.

Upper Indian Gulch

26 October 2020

When I last featured Indian Gulch on this blog, it was about the easy part, mostly a stroll up Trestle Glen Road. It ended with this glimpse of the living Indian Gulch Creek, bounding down the rock slopes of the Piedmont crustal block on its way to culverted oblivion beneath the elegant Trestle Glen neighborhood.

Upper Indian Gulch lies within Piedmont and the west fringe of Montclair that looks down upon Piedmont. Nowhere is the creek up there accessible to passers-by; if you want to see it you have to buy a house whose lot includes it, or make friends with someone who owns such a house. You’ll have to imagine it running in the dark underneath the street, as it does along La Salle Avenue just above St. James Drive.

Here’s an overview of the upper creek from Google Maps terrain view. The creek has three branches; the west fork is the main branch. To be a stickler, that fork should properly be called Indian Gulch Creek and the other two are just tributaries. The old property line between the two middle Peralta ranchos ran up this valley, Vicente’s on the left and Antonio’s on the right. Later the same line separated the Oakland and Brooklyn Townships of Alameda County. Today neither the ranchos nor the townships are relevant any more, but the boundary influenced the pattern of land ownership a century ago as Oakland expanded its territory and developers shaped the outskirts.

A stroll here is a workout. Part of my Ramble 4, Uptown to Montclair, goes up the creek’s middle fork but the steepest part is pedestrian-unfriendly. Three years ago I featured an excursion into the valley of the east fork. That pretty much exhausts the possibilities in those two valleys. In the west branch, two dead-end roads will take you to the floor of the valley, though the creek is not accessible. Indian Gulch Road leads down from Glen Alpine Road, just above the word “West”:

And Calvert Court swoops from Blair Avenue down into the creek’s highest watershed, where Oakland’s most isolated properties lie.

Here and there, you can get a look at the bedrock under the watershed: sandstone and mudstone of the Franciscan Complex.

And it’s hard, on Piedmont’s winding streets, to grasp the contours of the land. This view across the middle fork at Hampton Park is about as good as it gets.

Really, the best experience of these headwaters is on the rim roads that encircle the watershed. They aren’t photogenic in ways that my camera have caught many times over the years, but the views glimpsed through the trees and past the homes have always pleased my eye.

Looking east-northeast up Hampton Road at Sea View is a good view of the high rim of the east branch, topped by Pershing Drive.

By all means visit Oakland’s best bedrock there.

And don’t miss Wood Drive, along the north rim, where this excellent outcrop of Franciscan metachert awaits.

Indian Gulch is a good candidate for a circumambulation.