Archive for the ‘The Hayward fault’ Category

Lake Temescal, the west side

12 April 2021

For one of Oakland’s most rugged places, the west side of Lake Temescal doesn’t expose a lot of rock. But what’s there is unusual for Oakland, and interesting.

I’m talking about this ridge — tectonically, a shutter ridge — across the lake from the swimming beach.

The map of Lake Temescal Regional Park shows two trails there, the low one along the water and the high one up in the woods. An even higher trail, not marked on the map, is off limits and doesn’t expose much rock anyway.

I often wish I’d lived here in the 19th century when Oakland was new. It was in 1868 when Anthony Chabot acquired a steep little canyon back of the hills and built a dam to supply the young city with dependable water service. His technique, perfected in the gold fields of the Sierra, was to take a high-pressure water hose and wash down the sand and gravel from the hillsides to build the dam. I wish I could have inspected the scrubbed slopes at that time, but there were almost no trained geologists in the whole state, let alone me.

The canyon has a flat floor now, after decades of sedimentation, but you can see from the high trail that it’s still steep and narrow.

And the action didn’t end when Chabot finished the dam. He built a control tower in the new reservoir, but a landslide soon took it out. I’m guessing that was probably near the sluicegate where the beach house is today, and I’m guessing that the rainy winters of 1868-69 and 1869-70 plus afterslip and aftershocks of the big 1868 earthquake on the Hayward fault had something to do with it.

Speaking of which, two major strands of the Hayward fault run right through the reservoir. They’re helpfully shown on the map above. This is where the main strand crosses the dam. (Don’t worry, the massive dam will not fail even under the largest possible quake on this fault.)

The dam itself was raised and then lowered during the next few decades, and presumably the lake rose and fell too. Meanwhile trees and brush moved in upon the slopes where the Ohlone had previously maintained grassy meadows, and the rocks decayed and soil built up.

And the rocks themselves embody the complicated history of starting out in a vigorous subduction zone, being deeply buried and exhumed probably more than once, then being torn up and shoved around by the San Andreas fault system of which the Hayward fault is part.

All that is to say that Lake Temescal is a dynamic area at all time scales. It’s more complex than the small-scale geologic maps can show, even though it’s complex enough on that map.


KJfm, Franciscan melange; ch, chert block; af, artificial fill; sc, silica-carbonate rock; sp, serpentinite; Jsv, Leona volcanics; fs, Franciscan sandstone; KJkm, Knoxville Formation

The west side is mapped as melange, which is basically a mess of mashed-up sandstone with big blocks of other rocks, each with its own separate history, suspended in it. The little blip labeled “ch” is this block of chert at the top of Hill Road. So when I visited the west side trails last week, I expected to find things I didn’t expect. And most of the rock along the trails appears to be nondescript sandstone — I say appears because since hammering is forbidden, it’s hard to find a fresh surface. But lo and behold, along the high path coming down from Broadway Terrace, there’s the telltale gleam of blueschist in the exposed subsoil.

The color really comes out when you wet a piece.

Other apparently high-grade metamorphic rocks include this hard, glittering schist. Not having access to thin sections and petrographic microscopes, I can’t check for the presence of jadeite, which has been reported in blocks from this melange.

And over at the north end of the train is a distinctive outcrop of another schist. Hard rock supports slow-growing lichens, and the species differ depending on the rock’s chemistry.

Underneath the lichens, the rock is a bluish-gray mixture with a strongly folded texture, both signs of a rock that’s been through a lot of distortion at high pressure and temperature. These photos are from exposures by the lawn. The first shows the folding and the second shows fault-related crushing on the left side. The crushed material is called gouge, and bits of it are common in this sector.

My authority on Oakland’s Franciscan rocks, John Wakabayashi, holds that the west side of the lake hides the same ancient major thrust fault — a megathrust, in fact — that’s famously exposed in El Cerrito above the recycling center, where high-grade rocks have been pushed above lower-grade rocks. Unfortunately the fault itself appears to be in “a brush-filled gully with no exposure,” so it may be a while before we ever learn more.

But I did learn something more last week, about the beach house.

It is made with the local rock, namely the Leona volcanics. Whether the stones came from the hill just upslope to the east, the one that collapsed in the 1870s landslide, or from across the freeway in the great Tunnel Road cut during the 1930s, I do not know. I’m guessing the former, but I would be happy to be wrong if it means I can be certain. Putting the building and the roadcut in the same photo, there is a resemblance.

The fun thing is, both locations can be closely inspected. That sounds like a good afternoon project.

Arroyo Viejito

6 January 2020

Some of Oakland’s most interesting land is also its most inaccessible; I’m speaking of our streambeds. And on the whole, the largest remaining stretches of wild streambed belong to Arroyo Viejo. Just to orient you, here’s the Arroyo Viejo watershed, as it’s mapped today by the Alameda County Flood Control District. The red stripe, which I added, represents the Hayward fault. (I’ll return to that.)

Here’s a zoom-in to the lower right corner, showing the upper part of Arroyo Viejo and the valley of a defunct little stream that I’m calling Arroyo Viejito.

The peculiar feature that caught my eye several years ago is how Arroyo Viejito runs parallel to Arroyo Viejo, very close to it, with a distinct rocky ridge between the two streams. Today the two valleys are very different, and a century’s worth of maps hints at what happened. Here’s the 1897 topo map showing the two streams, underneath the word “Viejo.”

In 1915, the area was more accurately mapped, and the two streams are shown as extremely close together at one point.

Everything changed after this. The country club was expanded and the adjoining land was subdivided and developed into the very exclusive Sequoyah district starting in the early 1920s. At that time Golf Links Road was pushed through to what would become the Grass Valley district in the 1950s, and Arroyo Viejito was diverted into the large stream at their closest approach and a sewer line inserted into the abandoned valley. It was very handy for the developers. As of 1947, the little stream had vanished and the land lay open for a new wave of luxury homes.

As of 1980 the buildout around Arroyo Viejito was complete.

The sewer line is accompanied by a maintenance road that is now a nice place for the locals to walk, and it connects with the little-visited creek trail at the north edge of the zoo’s property. I featured this area, in passing, three years ago in Ramble 3.

The reason these two streams ran so close together is related to the Hayward fault. It’s been dragging the lower, western half of Arroyo Viejo north, and for the last few hundred thousand years the stream has stretched out along the fault line before turning toward the Bay. Models of landscape evolution suggest that the headwater streams have been getting squeezed, aligning themselves and crowding together.

The combination of an especially large earthquake and a major flood could cause Arroyo Viejito to break through the narrow waist and join Arroyo Viejo farther upstream, abandoning the stretch with the sewer line and leaving the ridge standing there for a few more thousand years until it erodes away. But impatient developers have short-circuited all of that, and now the little stream is defunct, its former catchment part of a sterile golf course.

As I said, it was the ridge between the two streams that caught my eye and dared me to set foot on it. It’s in the middle of this Google Earth view looking west.

Its sides are very steep; it’s like an island. One day I found that it has a tiny trail running along its top, and signs of an old road and excavations. My guess is that the ridge was dug up for fill material when the sewer line was put in. The high-resolution lidar data acquired along the Hayward fault a few years back covers the west half of the ridge, and the resulting digital elevation model (with the trees and buildings stripped away) shows these features plainly.

Lately I’ve visited this ridge and the stream valleys of both Arroyos, in search of access and ultimately in search of rocks. Access beyond what I’ve already mentioned is difficult, and I have paid dearly for it in poison-oak rash. But I shall return.

The bedrock map looks like this, but I am suspicious of all of it given the difficulty of access and the paucity of outcrops. One big goal of mine has been to inspect the stream bed where bedrock might be exposed, for some real ground truth. I suspect that geologists, while doing their best, have resorted to drawing lines based on the topography.

The green zone marked KJk is shale and conglomerate of the Knoxville Formation, and that’s what I’ve always found in the eastern chunk of it. This shale is just west of Golf Links road where it crosses the creek.

And the conglomerate is abundant as loose boulders (not bedrock) downstream. It’s beautiful stuff.

But I have found none of it yet in the western section. Instead, everywhere I’ve looked the rock is either coarse sandstone shot with calcite veins, interpreted as the very oldest part of the Knoxville . . .

. . . or familiar rocks of the Leona volcanics (Jsv).

This includes up on the little ridge and down in the Arroyo Viejo streambed.

I still have a good bit of territory to visit, though. The streambed will have to wait until dry season, when I can poke around this weird-ass lime-cemented breccia.

And there’s more ridge to check out. Outcrops like this are so crusted with lichen that I might need to bring a rock hammer for some very careful, unobtrusive chipping.

There are some other charms in this northernmost stretch of Knowland Park. Every time I’ve visited there are fresh deer bones, indicating a mountain lion’s sphere of influence. And the cries of exotic animals occasionally drift down from the zoo’s hilltop center.

No other place in the world exactly like that.

Anomalies of Sausal Creek: Dimond Canyon

14 October 2019

This is the second of four posts about the peculiarities of Sausal Creek, going from its headwaters to the Bay. Here I’ll address Dimond Canyon, the 2-kilometer segment between the Warren Freeway and the flats of Dimond Park. The steep walls of the canyon, which is several hundred feet deep, are entirely hard sandstone of the Franciscan Complex, part of the Piedmont block.

This is the same stone quarried for decades in Rockridge (the Bilger quarry) and the land that would later become Piedmont (the Blair quarries and the Davie Stadium quarry). In fact the Diamond Cañon Quarry was one of two here in the canyon. It’s now occupied by the Zion Lutheran Church, as seen here from across the canyon.

The quarry scar appears on this terrain map as a big round nick in the canyon wall next to Park Boulevard.

A while ago in this space I described Dimond Canyon as a classic water gap — a stream-cut gorge crossing a bedrock ridge that otherwise seems impenetrable.

Geology textbooks will tell you there are two ways for streams to make a water gap. In the first way, the stream was there first (an antecedent stream) and a ridge of resistant rocks rose up around it. In dynamic California, this is a straightforward explanation of our water gaps. In the second, the ridge was there first, inherent in ancient deformed rocks buried under younger strata, and the stream (a superposed stream) cut down to, then into it while stripping off the overlying material. That’s how they explain the Delaware Water Gap and other examples in the gentle Appalachians.

Dimond Canyon is actually a semi-classic water gap. Yes, the ridge it crosses must have risen while the stream was cutting down, but the story is complicated by the fact that the watershed upstream lies across the Hayward fault, and is constantly being moved to the right. This means the canyon has hosted streams from several different watersheds over the past million years or so.

Therefore the streams feeding Sausal Creek today could not have dug the canyon; some predecessor watershed did it. There must have been gaps and surges in the water (and sediments) flowing through this canyon. If we ran things backward a million years, what would it show? The exercise would be blurred by serious uncertainties, but the matter is not beyond all conjecture.

I beg your indulgence as I present some slides from my talk to the Friends of Sausal Creek last month. They’re Google Earth views looking west across the fault. Here’s today, with the fault trace shown in red.

The view may be a bit confusing as I rewind the motion on the fault at about 10 millimeters per year. The far side looks the same because we’re focusing on it while it moves leftward, toward San Leandro. For a long time, Sausal Creek has been carried past small watersheds that, like today’s, could not possibly have carved Dimond Canyon. But about a million years ago, Dimond Canyon would have lined up with the watershed of Arroyo Viejo.

This looks promising because the watershed (the part above the fault) is about twice the size of Sausal Creek’s, giving it roughly twice as much water and cutting power to match.

But to make the canyon, you have to have something pushing up the ridge while the stream across it keeps cutting its way down. There’s nothing obvious that would have been pushing up the bedrock ridge at this time.

Going back a bit further, though, we line up with the great big watershed of San Leandro Creek, a dozen times larger. This stream has plenty of cutting power, evident in the canyon it’s dug where the dam and reservoir sit.

And finally, we have a mechanism here for uplifting the ridge that Dimond Canyon cuts across. The hills of San Leandro consist of a large slab of gabbro so big and strong that it deflects the Hayward fault slightly. Back when the sandstone of Dimond Canyon was grinding past the gabbro of San Leandro, the jostling between these two bodies of rock, caught in a vice by the geometry of the fault (a restraining bend), would have pushed both sides upward because that’s the only way out of the vice. And all the while San Leandro Creek would have been cutting a nice deep water gap as that hard rock rose.

Eventually, inevitably, the fault carried the water gap out of reach, and ever since then Dimond Canyon has housed lesser creeks for episodes of a few hundred thousand years. Sausal Creek trickles down the canyon today not doing much to it, the shrunken tenant of a structure built by a mightier maker.

This story (and that’s all it is really) appeals to me because it would also explain the presence of the Fan — the swath of gold on the geologic map representing Pleistocene sediment.

I’ve always regarded it as a fossil alluvial fan because of its shape on the map, but maybe that’s accidental. Maybe it’s just a chunk of old East Bay land that was lifted along with the Piedmont block, or washed off of it afterward.

I first posted about the problem of Dimond Canyon more than 10 years ago. Takes a while to figure out some things.

Anomalies of Sausal Creek: The Headwaters

30 September 2019

The Sausal Creek watershed is full of anomalies and questions from its headwaters to its San Francisco Bay outlet. Here I’ll look at the top end of Sausal Creek — the part that isn’t Sausal Creek. The creek originates where three different tributaries join: Shephard Creek, Cobbledick Creek and Palo Seco Creek.

The divide between Shephard and Cobbledick runs up Chelton Drive, then Darnby and Carisbrook Drives, up to Skyline. The divide between Cobbledick and Palo Seco runs mostly up Castle Drive to Skyline, so if you know the area these are easy to visualize.

That map, from the Alameda County Flood Control and Water Conservation District, has Sausal Creek proper beginning at the junction of Shephard and Cobbledick, which is also where the Hayward fault crosses the creek (more about that below). But because that’s in a culvert deep beneath the Warren Freeway, for purposes of this post I prefer to put the origin a little farther down, in an easy-to-miss opening east of the parking lot of the Montclair Golf Course driving range at the head of Dimond Canyon. That’s where Palo Seco Creek, the third tributary, comes in from the redwood-filled canyon of Joaquin Miller Park.

So with that settled, let’s look at the headwaters on the geologic map. This area includes a wide variety of rock units — the Sausal Creek watershed touches more different rock types than any other Oakland stream.

Don’t worry, I won’t go into the rocks, although there are a lot of them and they’re interesting . . .

I’ve added the Hayward fault to the map, as a thick red line, just to show how different the rocks upstream and downstream are. That’s because motion on the fault has been dragging the west side to the north for a few million years. That explains two major peculiarities of Sausal Creek, the first being its lumpy longitudinal profile.

I made this stream profile by walking down the creek from the top of Eastwood Court to the Bay, recording elevations with my smartphone altimeter.

A normal stream profile describes a nearly smooth listric curve — steep at the top and level at the bottom. The bottom of the curve represents what’s called the base level for the whole stream, sea level in this case. A stream with a nearly perfect curve is said to be at grade. Two basic things will put kinks in that curve: rocks that are especially hard or soft, and changes in base level. For instance, ice ages lower the sea level by hundreds of feet, and streams have to adjust during that time by digging down their beds toward the new base level. (I alluded to this in my last post with respect to Lake Merritt.)

There’s a big discontinuity in this curve right where the Hayward fault crosses, just above the 3 kilometer mark. The lower half, Sausal Creek, is at grade, even though it crosses hard sandstone in Dimond Canyon and young sediment farther down. But the fault has ripped its head off and put on another head — the Shephard-Cobbledick-Palo Seco system. It’s a Frankenstein creek. I think this head transplant has happened more than once.

Sausal Creek, over the last million years or so, has done fine even with its head ripped off and replaced. The worst that might have happened is that it had less water in it for a while. But in the upper creek system, these changes have drastically affected its base level.

Picture it: the two sides of the Hayward fault are moving past each other at about 10 millimeters a year, or a kilometer every 100,000 years. So for a good long time, Shephard Creek flowed down against the high rocky ridge of the Piedmont hills. Very likely it turned north for a long ways, the way Temescal Creek does today, before flowing around the north end of the ridge. As its route to the Bay got longer and longer, the slope of the stream grew gentler as it remained at grade. The effective base level, that is to say, was up around the elevation of the Thornhill district.

Then along came Dimond Canyon, moseying up on the far side of the fault, and at some point Shephard Creek switched over to that route. All of a sudden, it had a lower base level. It was not at grade. So it started eroding downward into its streambed and eroding uphill, trying to re-establish that nice listric profile.

When that happens to streams, what geologists call a knickpoint appears in the profile. The extreme case of a knickpoint is a waterfall, but more often they’re just rapids. In Shephard Creek, there appear to be two knickpoints.

Pay attention next time you ride down Shepherd Canyon Road. There’s a nearly level stretch in the road between Saroni and Escher Drives, where the railroad trail meets the road, then a steep “rapids” below. The other knickpoint is under the landfill of Shepherd Canyon Park, where the creek is buried in a culvert. A more carefully made profile would show it better, but that may not be possible.

I could conjecture a story that accounts for these features, but there’s a lot I don’t know so it would just be armwaving. For instance, the stream profile is based on the elevations of the roadway rather than the actual streambed except for the part between Shepherd Canyon Park and Mountain Boulevard (which is so thickly wooded I don’t recommend you visit, even though I did) and the one data point at the golf club. For another, the history of vertical movements along the Hayward fault is almost completely unknown, other than that the hills on the east side are rising today at about a millimeter per year. So enough about that.

I mentioned that the creek has two major peculiarities, and here’s the second one. The upper part of the Sausal Creek watershed is not a pretty, textbook stream network shaped like a nice tree — what geologists call a dendritic drainage pattern. It’s more like a bush in a gale, and all of the streams that cross the fault are warped. Here’s how it looks in the set of stream maps on the Oakland Museum website:

And for comparison here’s Temescal Creek:

And Arroyo Viejo, the weirdest of all.

There’s a struggle going on between the stream’s innate tendency, driven by gravity, to dig itself a home with an optimal shape and the motion of the ground beneath, driven by tectonics, that keeps messing it up. The shapes of the streams, and the landscape they live in, are a snapshot of that struggle. They remind me of the shapes of trees high on windy mountains — although one case involves organisms and the other purely physical systems, the similarities are tantalizing.

Geologists are starting to explore this topic with computer models. A recent paper in Geophysical Research Letters, with the dry title “The Role of Near‐Fault Relief Elements in Creating and Maintaining a Strike‐Slip Landscape,” has some state-of-the-art animations that address the exact situation of Oakland’s fault-crossing streams. You don’t need to understand all the modeling details — I certainly don’t — to enjoy the illustrations and the movies.